Workshops

Workshops details now available!

AEGC 2021 features a range of workshops, offered onsite at the Brisbane Convention and Exhibition Centre and offsite at the Zillmere Core Library. There are two day workshops, full day workshops and half days workshops available from 14-16 September and 20 September.

Workshops registration fees

Registration Category Standard registration Student registration
Two days workshop                                (8.30am – 5:00pm for each day) AUD $450 AUD $225

Full day workshop                                        (8.30am – 5:00pm)

AUD $250 AUD $150

Half day workshop                                 (8.30am – 12.30pm or 1:00pm – 5:00pm)

AUD $125 AUD $75

Full day catering (morning tea, lunch and afternoon tea) included for two day and full day workshops and break catering (morning tea or afternoon tea) included for half day workshops.

Please note there is a minimum number of attendees required for any of the workshops to run and it a particular workshop do not meet the minimum number, it will be cancelled. You will be given the option to transfer your workshop registration to a different workshop or will be refunded.

Workshop Information

Tuesday 14 September

Unlocking the value of Structural Geology in Mining, Exploration and 3D Modelling - Day 1 of 2 - Offsite at Zillmere Core Library

Organisation: SRK Consulting and Seequent

Speakers: Dr Mark Rieuwers (SRK Consulting), Mr Ben Jupp (SRK Consulting), Ms Kathryn Gall (Seequent)

Overview:

SRK and Seequent host structural geology and 3D modelling short courses in Perth and Kalgoorlie. In this two-day course, you will develop skills in structural data collection and interpretation through hands-on, practical exercises using drill core samples and structural data from real deposits.

You’ll learn how to integrate structural geology with 3D geological modelling and gain confidence in effective application of structural geology in greenfields and brownfields exploration and resource estimation.

Who should attend: 

Geologists seeking to learn the importance of structural geology and apply structural geology in 3D modelling in Leapfrog.

Leapfrog Fundamentals Training or a sound background in Leapfrog modelling is highly recommended prior to attending this course

A laptop with windows and the latest Leapfrog Geo software is essential for the duration of this course

Learning outcomes:

DAY 1: Data Collection & Interpretation

  • The importance of structural geology to exploration and mining projects
  • Measuring and acquisition methodology in the field and using drill core
  • Effective QAQC of structural data
  • How to analyse, interpret and visualise structural data in stereographic nets and in 3D

DAY 2: Using Structural Data & 3D Modelling

  • Practical experience building 3D models in Leapfrog Geo
  • A better understanding of structure and deposit geology through 3D integration and modelling
  • How to interpret structural data to determine the controls for modelling mineralisation

NOTE: Return bus transfer from Brisbane Convention and Exhibition Centre to the Zillmere Core Library on day 1 of the workshop is included in registration fees.

Wednesday 15 September

Unlocking the value of Structural Geology in Mining, Exploration and 3D Modelling - Day 2 of 2 - Brisbane Convention and Exhibition Centre

Organisation: SRK Consulting and Seequent

Speakers: Dr Mark Rieuwers (SRK Consulting), Mr Ben Jupp (SRK Consulting), Ms Kathryn Gall (Seequent)

Overview:

SRK and Seequent host structural geology and 3D modelling short courses in Perth and Kalgoorlie. In this two-day course, you will develop skills in structural data collection and interpretation through hands-on, practical exercises using drill core samples and structural data from real deposits.

You’ll learn how to integrate structural geology with 3D geological modelling and gain confidence in effective application of structural geology in greenfields and brownfields exploration and resource estimation.

Who should attend: 

Geologists seeking to learn the importance of structural geology and apply structural geology in 3D modelling in Leapfrog.

Leapfrog Fundamentals Training or a sound background in Leapfrog modelling is highly recommended prior to attending this course

A laptop with windows and the latest Leapfrog Geo software is essential for the duration of this course

Learning outcomes:

DAY 2: Using Structural Data & 3D Modelling

  • Practical experience building 3D models in Leapfrog Geo
  • A better understanding of structure and deposit geology through 3D integration and modelling
  • How to interpret structural data to determine the controls for modelling mineralisation
Northwest Queensland Mineral Province Deposits: Exploration signatures and haloes in data and drill core - Day 1 of 2 - Offsite at Zilmere Core Library

Organisation: W.H. Bryan Mining, Geology Research Centre, Sustainable Minerals Institute, University of Queensland

Speakers: Paul Gow (Sustainable Minerals Institute), Rick Valenta (Sustainable Minerals Institute), Nathan Fox (Sustainable Minerals Institute), Vladimir Lisitsin (Geological Survey of Queensland)

Overview:

The Geological Survey of Queensland is compiling a collection of representative drill core from key mineral deposits across the state. In conjunction, the W.H. Bryan Mining and Geology Research Centre (Sustainable Minerals Institute – UQ) has undertaken compilation of exploration and deposit data in a digital 3D environment from many of the deposits and their immediate environs, with a focus on the deposit signatures and haloes.

This 2-day course will walk through a number of world class ore deposits by:
i)  providing background to the deposit type and its geology,
ii)  presenting the deposit signatures and halo in a digital 3D environment, and
iii)  having the core laid out for participants to review.

The course would cover approximately 4-6 deposits in two days, with potential deposits including Mount Isa Copper and George Fisher Pb-Zn deposits, Cannington Pb-Zn-Ag, Ernest Henry Cu-Au, Eloise Cu-Au, Mary Kathleen uranium, Walford Creek Cu-Co. The location will be in Brisbane at the GSQ Zillmere core facility.

Who should attend: 

Geoscientists with a desire to:
i)  understand the signatures of mineral deposit types from Northwest Queensland, and
ii) examine the mineralisation, alteration and hosts rocks in drill core.

Learning outcomes:

An appreciation of the appearance of key deposit types in various datasets and drill core, with the intent to aid explorers in the field.

NOTE: Return bus transfer from Brisbane Convention and Exhibition Centre to the Zillmere Core Library on both workshop days is included in registration fees.

Handling and inverting MT data with open source tools - Day 1 of 2

Organisation: Geology Survey of Qld

Speakers: Dr Alison Kirkby (Geoscience Australia), Dr Hoel Seille (CSIRO), Dr Kate Robertson (Geological Survey of South Australia)

Overview:

This two-day workshop will leave you with a better understanding of the open-source tools which are available for handling and inverting MT data. Presenters will showcase a range of tools and walk participants through their use.

The first day is dedicated to hands on experience with MTpy codes. These have been developed to assist in data analysis and management. They also provide a set of tools for preparing inversion files and visualising inversion results.

Who should attend: 

Geophysicists or geophysics students who want to gain familiarity with new and existing codes for analysing, handling and inverting MT data. This course will have something to offer for experienced MT practitioners and novices alike. 

Learning outcomes:

  1. An understanding of some of the open-source tools available to handle and model MT data
  2. Familiarity with MTpy codes
  3. Ability to use Occam 1D/2D inversion
  4. Ability to undertake Bayesian 1D depth to basement inversion
  5. Ability to use MARE2D inversion
Geoscience for CO2 geological storage (Full day workshop)

Organisation: Curtin University

Speakers: To be advised

Overview:

Geological storage of carbon dioxide is recognised by the IPCC, IEA and other august bodies as a critical strategy for decarbonisation of industry and meeting the deep emissions reductions required in energy-intensive industries to limit warming to 1.5°C. Over the last two decades, Australia has become one of world leaders in carbon capture and storage (CCS), with the world’s largest CO2 storage project on Barrow Island, with research and demonstration projects such as CO2CRC Otway, CarbonNet in the Gippsland Basin, the CTSCo Surat Basin storage project and associated research projects through ANLEC R&D. This full-day workshop will review Australian and overseas experience in characterisation and monitoring of CO2 storage with practical application of novel technologies such as fibre optics for seismic acquisition and discuss the way forward in scaling up CCS technology.

Who should attend: 

Geoscientists and engineers interested in geological, geophysical and geoengineering aspects of carbon storage.

Downhole Assay: The measurement and applications (Full day workshop)

Organisation: MPC Kinetic

More information coming soon!

Ancient rocks, ancient culture, and you: Enhancing Australian First Nations engagement and participation in Australian geoscience programs (Half day workshop)

Organisation: AuScope, Geoscience Australia & CSIRO Mineral Resources,

Speaker: Ms Jo Condon (AuScope|NCRIS)

Overview:

How can we be more inclusive of Australian First Nations Peoples in designing, undertaking, and reflecting on Australian geoscientific programs for mutual and environmental benefit?

This workshop invites you to learn about initiatives and requirements to support inclusive and cross-cultural outcomes in Australian geoscientific programs. Together, we will consider examples of successful cross-cultural engagements and discuss best practice engagement for working together on traditional lands in the city and the field. We will also explore ways that we can each enact meaningful allyship with Australian First Nations Peoples.

This workshop will be Australian First Nations Peoples led and supported by AuScope, Geoscience Australia, and CSIRO Mineral Resources.

Please stay tuned for workshop and possible format (COVID-19 pending) updates. See you soon!

Petrophysics Formation Evaluation Introduction (Half day workshop)

Organisation: Haliburton Australia

Speaker: Samir Marzouk (Haliburton Australia)

Overview:

Formation evaluation is the science and “art” of taking multiple wellbore measurements (all of which are indirect) and constructing an integrated description of formation properties.

The Introduction to Petrophysics Formation Evaluation half-day workshop, will give participants an overview of well logging, basic rock properties, borehole environment, measurement tools and interpretation concepts.

Who should attend:
Geologist, Well site Geologist, Geophysicist and Petrophysicist.

Learning outcomes:
Participants will be able to understand, read, describe and interpret the following:

  • Data preparation
  • Data QC
  • Borehole Environment
  • Lithology

Thursday 16 September

Handling and inverting MT data with open source tools - Day 2 of 2

Organisation: Geology Survey of Qld

Speakers: Dr Alison Kirkby (Geoscience Australia), Dr Hoel Seille (CSIRO), Dr Kate Robertson (Geological Survey of South Australia)

Overview:

This two-day workshop will leave you with a better understanding of the open-source tools which are available for handling and inverting MT data. Presenters will showcase a range of tools and walk participants through their use.

Day two will focus on inversion of MT data. Three sessions will cover off on Occam 1D/2D, 1D Bayesian inversion for depth to basement and MARE2D codes.

Who should attend: 

Geophysicists or geophysics students who want to gain familiarity with new and existing codes for analysing, handling and inverting MT data. This course will have something to offer for experienced MT practitioners and novices alike. 

Learning outcomes:

  1. An understanding of some of the open-source tools available to handle and model MT data
  2. Familiarity with MTpy codes
  3. Ability to use Occam 1D/2D inversion
  4. Ability to undertake Bayesian 1D depth to basement inversion
  5. Ability to use MARE2D inversion
Northwest Queensland Mineral Province Deposits: Exploration signatures and haloes in data and drill core - Day 2 of 2 - Offsite at Zilmere Core Library

Organisation: University of Queensland

Speakers: Paul Gow (Sustainable Minerals Institute), Rick Valenta (Sustainable Minerals Institute), Nathan Fox (Sustainable Minerals Institute), Vladimir Lisitsin (Geological Survey of Queensland)

Overview:

The Geological Survey of Queensland is compiling a collection of representative drill core from key mineral deposits across the state. In conjunction, the W.H. Bryan Mining and Geology Research Centre (Sustainable Minerals Institute – UQ) has undertaken compilation of exploration and deposit data in a digital 3D environment from many of the deposits and their immediate environs, with a focus on the deposit signatures and haloes.

This 2-day course will walk through a number of world class ore deposits by:

i)  providing background to the deposit type and its geology,

ii)  presenting the deposit signatures and halo in a digital 3D environment, and

iii)  having the core laid out for participants to review.

The course would cover approximately 4-6 deposits in two days, with potential deposits including Mount Isa Copper and George Fisher Pb-Zn deposits, Cannington Pb-Zn-Ag, Ernest Henry Cu-Au, Eloise Cu-Au, Mary Kathleen uranium, Walford Creek Cu-Co. The location will be in Brisbane at the GSQ Zillmere core facility.

Who should attend: 

Geoscientists with a desire to:
i)  understand the signatures of mineral deposit types from Northwest Queensland, and
ii) examine the mineralisation, alteration and hosts rocks in drill core.

Learning outcomes:

An appreciation of the appearance of key deposit types in various datasets and drill core, with the intent to aid explorers in the field.

NOTE: Return bus transfer from Brisbane Convention and Exhibition Centre to the Zillmere Core Library on both workshop days is included in registration fees.

New and innovative software applications for interpretation of geoscientific data; 3D modelling and inversion, machine learning, software connectivity via the Python API (Full day workshop)

Organisation: Mira Geoscience

Speakers: Mr Glenn Pears (Mira Geoscience), Dr James Reid (Mira Geoscience), Mr Jean-Philippe Paiement (Mira Geoscience), Ms Aurore Joly (Mira Geoscience), Mr Dominique Fournier (Mira Geoscience)

Overview:

This workshop covers a variety of innovative software applications for interpretation of geoscientific data through a combination of presentations, demonstration, and hands-on software participation. Software exercises are centred around the Geoscience ANALYST software. Geoscience ANALYST is a unique standalone application that allows users to import, visualize, annotate, save, and distribute a multitude of 3D geoscientific data types and models. Topics specifically covered by this workshop include:

  • Review of Geoscience ANALYST features.
  • Anomaly detection, forward modelling, and unconstrained inversion of potential fields data (SimPEG and Scikit-Learn).
  • Geologically based geophysical modelling using VP Geophysics Suite.
  • Combining Python with Geoscience ANALYST through the Python Application Programming Interface (API), opening geoscientific datasets to open-source libraries. A library of existing applications known as “geoapps” will be reviewed.
  • Opening the Machine Learning, targeting, and cluster analysis black box.

This workshop includes hands-on exercises, and all attendees are welcomed to participate in the activities, but they will be required to bring their own laptop. Necessary software installations will be provided in advance of the workshop.

Who should attend: 

Geophysics, geologists, geoscientists interested in software innovations and advancements.

Learning outcomes:

Awareness of new software/applications for the mining industry.  How to use the python API of 3D modelling software.  A clear understanding of machine learning. 

Rock Physics/Petrophysics in Energy, Minerals and Groundwater: Dreams, Expectations and Realities (Full day workshop)

Organisation: ASEG/CSIRO

Speakers: To be advised

Overview:

Rock physics and petrophysics relationships are routinely used in hydrocarbon exploration in support of understanding reservoir behaviour by allowing to derive properties of relevance such as porosity, permeability and gas saturation from seismic, electromagnetic and well log data. The collection of petrophysical data by minerals and groundwater practitioners provides a foundation for the derivation of similarly domain specific relevant properties such as ore grade or hydraulic conductivity. The core element of this forum is an interdisciplinary review of the use of rock physics and petrophysics for the delineation and characterisation of water, mineral and energy resources.

Who should attend: 

Geoscientists in industry, academia and government interested in understanding how rock physics and more broadly petrophysics information can improve the delineation and characterisation of a subsurface resource. Those involved in the acquisition, processing, and interpretation of seismic, EM, MT, gravity, and other surface surveys in the fields of natural gas, mineral, and groundwater exploration may discover new powerful resource characterisation techniques and concepts seldom applied in their domains. Petrophysicists involved in the acquisition, processing, and interpretation of wireline and LWD data may gain an understanding of how rock physics and petrophysics relations can allow for the conversions the log data into geo-parameters of relevance such as porosity, permeability, ore grade or gas saturation. Rock physicists will discover how they can apply their knowledge in another domain. Hydrogeologists will learn how surface and borehole observations are interpreted to produce the porosity-permeability relations used in hydrogeological models. Geologists and sedimentologists might explore how their domain knowledge can be applied across scales, parameterised, and used for improved subsurface characterisation.

Anyone with an interest in quantitative reservoir characterisation. Ideally attendees will be familiar with concepts of AVO and elastic AVO inversion (both deterministic and stochastic).

Learning outcomes:

This workshop is designed as a forum to exchange ideas about past, present, and future applications of rock physics and petrophysics relations for improved delineation and characterisation of energy, mineral and groundwater resources. The attendees will first and foremost gain an appreciation of how rock physics and petrophysics relations can allow to make better informed decisions in mineral, hydrocarbon and groundwater exploration.

Probabilistic seismic inversion – recent advances in reservoir characterisation (Full day workshop)

Organisation: Qeye

Speaker: Ask Frode Jakobsen (Qeye)

Overview:

Traditional seismic inversion methods have either been:

Deterministic – giving a single most likely (in some sense) view of the subsurface.
Or
Stochastic – yielding a number of realizations of how the subsurface may be configured.

Recent algorithmic advances have seen the emergence of a powerful third method, probabilistic inversion. Probabilistic inversions attempt to estimate the probability distributions of subsurface properties from the data rather than returning the most likely result (deterministic inversion) or drawing a series of realizations from an unknown probability distribution (stochastic inversion).

In this workshop Ask Frode Jakobsen will review the literature on probabilistic inversion, gently introducing the participants to the new terminology and mathematics required. The strengths and pitfalls of this new method as compared to deterministic and stochastic methods will be highlighted through a series of synthetics and real data case studies many from within the Asia Pacific region.

Who should attend: 

Anyone with an interest in quantitative reservoir characterisation.  Ideally attendees will be familiar with concepts of AVO and elastic AVO inversion (both deterministic and stochastic).

Learning outcomes:

Attendees will leave with a review of the most relevant publications in the field and a selection of examples and case studies highlighting power of probabilistic methods as opposed to deterministic and stochastic methods for subsurface characterisation.

Passive Seismic Imaging for Mineral Exploration (Full day workshop)

Organisation: Institute of Mine Seismology

Speakers: Dr Phillipe Dales (Institute of Mine Seismology), Mr Olaf Goldbach (Institute of Mine Seismology), Dr Gerrit Olivier (Institute of Mine Seismology)

Overview:

In recent years, passive seismic imaging has proved useful to image the subsurface for mineral exploration. This technique is a cost-effective and environmentally friendly method that can image the sub-surface down to 2 km depth. Ambient background vibrations and / or induced seismicity are used to produce high resolution images, without the need for an active source at a fraction of the cost of an active seismic survey. At IMS, we have conducted several successful passive seismic exploration projects in the US, Canada, Australia and Africa. One of the main goals of the method is to cut exploration costs by reducing the amount of drilling required for target identification and delineation.

In this workshop we will discuss the method and theory of Ambient Noise Surface Wave Tomography (ANSWT) and Local Earthquake Tomography (LET) and present numerous case studies showing subsurface imaging results from various near-mine and remote exploration projects. These examples will be diverse in scale, geological setting and target commodity. There will also be an opportunity for interested parties to discuss their exploration projects with IMS specialists during the free consultancy session in the afternoon.

Program:

1. Methods / theory of passive seismic imaging

– How and why does the method work? Which methods should be used in what circumstances? What equipment should be used? Are my goals achievable? If so, how many seismic sensors are needed?

2. Various examples / case studies

– Imaging under cover, identifying faults and geological features in 3D data, near-mine exploration using seismicity and blasting, remote and regional scale exploration using ambient noise, etc.

3. Joint interpretation of passive seismic imaging results with existing gravity and electromagnetic (EM) results

– Quantitative interpretation of seismic imaging results by joint inversion of passive seismic and gravity, using passive seismic results to strip cover from EM and gravity results.

4. Free consultancy time

– Discussion of potential exploration projects with workshop delegates

Geomechanics: Start the walk and talk the talk (Full day workshop)

Organisation: Tech Limit

Speaker: Dr Scott Mildren (Tech Limit Pty Ltd)

Overview:

  • What is geomechanics?
    • Stress versus strength
    • Components of a stress model
  • Types of geomechanical models and when to use them
    • 1D and 3D models
    • Static and dynamic models
    • Analytical and numerical models
  • How geomechanical models are built
    • Image logs and stress orientation
    • Mechanical stratigraphy
    • Stress magnitudes
    • Model calibrations and uncertainties
    • Data requirements
  • Geomechanical applications
    • Wellbore stability and well planning
    • Fracture permeability
    • Top and fault seal breach
    • Sand Production
    • Hydraulic fracturing
    • Unconventionals
    • Sequestration and EOR
    • Geothermal
  • Geomechanical tools
    • Software packages
    • Geomechanical resources

Who should attend: 

Geoscientists, drillers, and managers.

Learning outcomes:

An understanding of geomechanics fundamentals.

How geomechanical models are built and what data is required to build them.

How geomechanics is applied to different operational problems.

Frontiers of AEM inversion and interpretation for minerals, energy and groundwater applications (Full day workshop)

Organisation: Geoscience Australia

Speakers: Kerry Key (Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory, Columbia U.), Lindsey Heagy (Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory), Jovan Silic (Intrepid Geophysics), Anders vest Christiansen (Aarhus Hydrogeophysics), Anandaroop Ray (Geoscience Australia)

Overview:

The morning session will focus on inversion of AEM data. Various techniques ranging from deterministic methods based on regularisation to Bayesian approaches dependent on prior knowledge will be showcased. Further, the relative merits of using 1D, 2D or 3D physics will be reviewed, along with ‘nuisance’ considerations such as receiver-transmitter geometry and geological noise such as SPM and IP effects. Other novel approaches such as the use of neural networks and high-performance computing (HPC) will also be covered.

The afternoon session will delve into the use of AEM inversion products for interpreting subsurface geology. Topics include:
– The interpretation of inverted subsurface conductivity with associated uncertainty (when available), using tools built at GA in the Minerals, Energy and Groundwater Division.
– The integration of additional geological and geophysical datasets that contribute to mineral and groundwater resource assessments. These will feature the identification of lithostratigraphic variation in sediments, structural features such as faults and folds, and geomorphic features such as paleo-valleys.
– Cover-thickness estimations, as well as the ability to use AEM data to map the distribution of (potentially prospective) stratigraphic units undercover.
– The mapping of electrical conductors associated with potential mineral host rocks and structures, and their implications.
– From a groundwater context, the interpretation of AEM data in understanding flow pathways, compartmentalisation, hydro-chemical dispersion pathways, potential variation in transmissivity and insights into groundwater quality.

Following the presentations, there will be a demonstration of a GA-developed web app for visualising the range of AEM inversions and using them for (hydro)-geological interpretation. For those who are interested, the app will be deployed in the cloud, allowing the audience to run the workflow themselves!  Geoscience Australia’s current and future interpretation work on the ever-expanding AusAEM survey will also be demonstrated.

Who should attend: 

Industry, academic and Government Agency geoscientists who employ airborne EM datasets to answer regional to district-scale problems for mineral and groundwater investigations.

Learning outcomes:

  • Provide an overview of the inversion techniques available
  • Provide participants with an understanding of the uncertainties involved with different inversion-modelling approaches
  • Understanding and treatment of ‘nuisance’ issues: IP and SPM effects, and the impact of transmitter/receiver motion
  • Some novel interpretation products and applications stemming from GA’s work with AusAEM1/2 and groundwater data

Monday 20 September

Cloncurry Mineral System: New tools and techniques for Future Discoveries (Full day workshop)

Organisation: CSIRO Mineral Resources

Speakers: Jim Austin (CSIRO), Renee Birchall (CSIRO), Paul Gow /Rick Valenta (UQ), Vladimir Lisitsin / Courtenay Dhnaram (GSQ), Tobias Schlegel (CSIRO), Jim Austin (CSIRO)

Overview:

This workshop which provides results of the Geological Survey of Queensland’s New Discovery Program builds on the deposit Atlas work undertaken by the BRC (covered in pre-conference workshop #??). It introduces a new scale integrated geoscientific dataset based on samples from the majority of deposits and significant prospects across the Cloncurry district, including Ernest Henry, Cannington, Starra, SWAN, Eloise and Osborne. This workshop shares insights from a suite scale-integrated petrophysical, structural, mineralogical, geochemical and hyperspectral data. It is unique dataset that allows us to examine all the data at the same scale, providing:

• new insights into deposit genesis and timing for iron oxide copper-gold (IOCG), iron sulphide copper-gold (ISCG), and Broken Hill type (BHT) Ag-Zn-Pb styles of mineralisation.
• constraints on zonation in mineralogy, geochemistry and petrophysical and hyperspectral properties of various mineralisation styles
• quantification of geophysical effects of various types of alteration styles present across the district, and insight into more enlightened geophysical targeting
• associations between various styles of alteration and different structural regimes, and better understanding of the critical structural controls on various styles of mineralisation
• machine learning approaches to identify critical datasets for the next paradigm shift in exploration strategy in the area

The workshop will be comprised of presentations, allow time for discussion and include demonstrations of handheld tools that are commonly under-utilised in mineral exploration, including gamma-ray, XRF, hyperspectral. It will outline new approaches to analysis, integration and up-scaling of data using various software platforms including LeapFrogTM, ioGASTM, ModelvisionTM, Geoscience AnalystTM and Discover3DTM.

Who should attend: 

Mineral Explorers, Mineral Exploration Technology Service Providers, Data Scientists, Structural Geologists, Geophysicists, Geochemists, Geologists, and anyone interested and how geoscientific data can be better integrated to provide meaningful insights for exploration.

Learning outcomes:

  1. To provide the geologist with an understanding of the various types of data that can be collected from drill holes or wells and what types of geological information these data will provide.
  2. To provide the geologist with an introduction to modern data analytics techniques to help them get the most out of their data.
Understanding and interpreting drill hole and well log data for subsurface characterisation in minerals and energy using modern data analytics techniques (Full day workshop)

Organisation: CSIRO Energy and CSIRO Mineral Resources

Speakers: Dr Ben Clennell (CSIRO Energy, Australia), Dr Irina Emelyanova (CSIRO Energy, Australia), Dr Morgan Williams (CSIRO Mineral Resources, Australia),  Dr June Hill (CSIRO Mineral Resources, Australia)

Overview:
We cover a deep understanding of downhole petrophysical data (including what types of data can be collected and how they can be interpreted) and geochemical analysis of drill hole samples (how to analyse, visualise and interpret geochemical data). Then we provide an overview of selected modern data analytics methods for univariate and multivariate data, including machine learning and multiscale analysis. Case studies will be used to illustrate the methods.

Who should attend:
Geologists in mineral exploration and mining or oil and gas who want an understanding of how petrophysical and geochemical data can be used to provide useful geological information, both from the perspective of what the data measures and what analytics can be used to interpret the data rapidly and consistently. This course is designed for the geologist who is curious about the methods which span commodities across minerals and oil & gas.

Learning outcomes:

  1. To provide the geologist with an understanding of the various types of data that can be collected from drill holes or wells and what types of geological information these data will provide.
  2. To provide the geologist with an introduction to modern data analytics techniques to help them get the most out of their data.
Applied machine learning for geoscientists (Full day workshop)

Organisation: Solve Geosolutions

Chairs: Ms Luisa Herrmann (Solve Geosolutions), Mr Mark Grujic (Solve Geosolutions)

Overview:

Machine Learning (ML) in geoscience has left the realm of curiosity; the mining and mineral exploration industries have adopted the advances that the field provides, from exploration through to ore body knowledge, mine planning and operations.

Join us to gain insight into core ML concepts in the context of geoscience. Gain an understanding of the possibilities and pitfalls of applied ML via a mix of theory, emerging research, case-studies and first-hand accounts from industry and external guest-speakers. The day will end with a panel discussion where you will have the opportunity to ask all your questions about applied machine learning in geoscience.

This one-day workshop aims to leave you with the confidence to identify aspects of a geoscientific workflow that can be augmented by relevant ML technologies, while being more aware of common ML fallacies in the context of geoscience.

Who should attend: 

Geoscientists and mining professionals who are:

  1. Interested in learning more about the use of ML in their subdiscipline.
  2. Already involved with ML processes and want to better understand and critique their models.
  3. Wanting to understand the high-level mining and exploration problems that are suited to ML.

 

Learning outcomes:

  1. An introduction to ML, with a focus on its role in Mining and Exploration, now and into the future.
  2. An understanding of how ML is being applied in the mining and exploration industry, in academia and in other industries, through current examples.
  3. A chance to ask questions in a chaired, panel discussion around the strategy, ethics and future of ML in geoscience.
Geological Interpretation of Aeromagnetic Data (Full day workshop)

Organisation: Southern Geoscience Consultants

Speakers: Anne Tomlinson (Southern Geoscience Consultants), Heather Ballantyne (Southern Geoscience Consultants), Yvonne Wallace (Southern Geoscience Consultants)

Overview:

Magnetic survey coverage is rapidly expanding worldwide but our ability to assimilate these data into exploration programs is not keeping pace. This introductory course aims to enlighten participants on the strengths and weaknesses of potential field methods and to illustrate how best they can be used to progress exploration programs.

This is an introductory day designed to inform attendees of the range of applications of aeromagnetic data and the key steps involved in the integration of aeromagnetic data with geology. Participants will be introduced to the concept of mapping geology and structure as expressed in the magnetic response to develop a lithostratigraphic interpretation using aeromagnetic data.

Who should attend: 

• Project personnel involved in interpretation
• Management responsible for cost-effective exploration
• Geologists and geophysicists who want to better understand the utility of magnetic data in exploration

Learning outcomes:

• Uses of aeromagnetics and case studies to illustrate integration of aeromagnetic-geology integration.
• Principles and styles of aeromagnetic-geology integration.
• Understanding of magnetisation in rocks, aeromagnetic “geological” anomalies, and a discussion of aeromagnetic effects in mineralised environments.
• Planning surveys, data acquisition, processing, and enhancement including filtering and transformation of aeromagnetic data.
• Understanding of modelling and inversion.

Fault Seal Trap Analysis and Risking or Oil and Gas Prospects (Full day workshop)

Organisation: Southern Highlands Structural Geology

Speakers: Titus Murray (Southern Highlands Structural Geology), Bill Power (Southern Highlands Structural Geology)

Overview:

Introduction to Structural Analysis for Groundwater
Faults and fracture are ubiquitous and with tectonics control erosion and sediments. In most cases, they bring deeply buried ore closer to the surface. In groundwater regimes, faults/fractures guide flow and recharge. A systematic analysis of geologic structures will better define critical aquitard/aquifer geometry and allow for adequate parameterisation of models.

Cross-Section Analysis
Cross-sections provide an invaluable view of the subsurface. They help all subsurface practitioners: understand stratigraphic thickness, erosion, and fault movement. They form a valuable part of any report. We will learn how to project well, seismic and outcrop data to sections. Understand the effects of a vertical exaggeration and orientation. Begin to interpret, faults and folds consistently.
Practice sketching structural evolution through time and review available structural modelling tools.

Faulted Map Analysis
In the time of 3D modelling, there is still a place for well-produced depth structure contour maps in reporting reserves and environmental assessments. We can use maps to assess fault geometries, relationships and regional statistics. During the training, you will learn how to use a set of easy to use quantitative tools to review and improve maps. Using high- quality maps and a set of geometric techniques, an understanding of how fluids may move around and through the subsurface geology is possible.

Aquitards, aquifers, and mechanical stratigraphy
A stratigraphic analysis is vital to evaluating flow in fractures and around faults. Similarly, some rocks define seals/aquitards. Participants will learn to identify ductile layers that are unlikely to fracture and rocks that will have well-connected fractures. Key learning will be the ability to use depositional models to identify broad regions of fracture-resistant, low permeability facies. Students will use the concept of mechanical stratigraphy to estimate fracture connectivity and storage.

Groundwater flow in and around fault zones
Students will work through a conceptual model for flow across, up and along faults. We will work on a series of scenarios based on the geometry of the fault and flow within permeable versus fractured rocks. A summary of the commonly used fault seal algorithms will be provided along with case studies. A series of exercises will help participants to explore flow rates related to the models. Using case studies, we will explore the practical impact of fault-related flow.

Conceptualising faults in Environmental Impact Statements
Using a conceptual framework, students will learn how to codify the impact of faults on a region’s hydrogeology. Using consistent models of fault damage zones, fracture transmissivity and matrix flow. We will explore these flow processes in a framework reviewing developments in CSG, opencut and underground coal mining.

This course provides an overview of examples and learning outcomes. Participants will better understand when structural support is needed to help understand the impacts of faults on groundwater. In particular they will know how to quickly assess where aquitards are in the geological succession and how to asses the validity of structural interpretations. Finally graduates will be able to describe the style and nature of flow in fractures faults and damage zones.

Who should attend: 

The training is intended as a primer on fault flow analysis for generalist geologist, hydrogeologist and groundwater modelers. It will also be broad enough to act as a primer for geoscientist working to better understand the impact of fluid flow phenomena in minerals and hydrocarbons

Learning outcomes:

An ability to talk knowledgably about fault geometries statistic and their flow characteristics. Students will be able to recognise where their project sits in the spectrum of faulted aquifers and aquitards.